In twenty-five years of fighting for maculine restoration, the greatest compliment I have received as it relates to the masculine journey was from John Eldredge, my mentor and long-time friend. Among a circle of Kingdom-hearted leaders, John described me as a man whose hidden life exceeds his teaching, a man who offers out of the overflowing reservoir of what he lives. John’s words were deeply humbling, and the vision of living from an interior overflow of God’s life within is something I pursue with all my strength. There is no hour more critical than now to become curious as to how we recover more of this reservoir of God welling up from within us to offer others.

 

In his upcoming book, Resilient, John makes this observation: “Human beings are at the same time both resilient and unpredictably fragile….A better test for how vulnerable we may actually be is to check our reserve tanks.”

 

The temptation to offer, even out of exhaustion and fatigue, is relentless. But simply put, we cannot offer what we do not have. Which leaves us with a dilemma. In our contemporary context of more and more, faster and faster, always up and to the right, how do we become the kind of men who can offer not out of lack, but out of an overflow of living water welling up within our masculine souls?

 

You see, every boy knows he was made to be powerful. As an acorn carries the blueprint of the oak tree, so the heart of every boy holds the possibility of becoming a wholehearted king whose strength brings goodness to all under his care. Yet the headlines often confirm what we know too well from our own stories: the anguished consequences of masculine power gone awry.

 

As Dallas Willard said, “The primary work of God is finding men in whom he can entrust power. And the primary story of most men is that power bringing harm to themselves and those under their care.”

 

Masculinity is in need of restoration. And this desperate reality is becoming more vividly apparent as the pace and pressures of contemporary life exponentially increase. So what is the way, and how can men find it?

 

Curated and distilled over two decades, the message of Becoming a King offers a path to navigate the seemingly impossible waters of our cultural moment and restore the hearts of men in the image of our strong, present, wise, and loving God.

 

Join me as I invite you to recover your strength and restore your heart as a man.

 

 

This free six-week guided online study is designed to nourish and heal the hearts of men in the church today. And together with a free and all-new facilitator’s guide, it is a timely resource for those who have a heart to offer strength, care, and much needed masculine initiation to the men in their community.

 

Start with your own heart, as a man. Register here and give yourself the gift of receiving desperately needed care. And from your restored strength and recovered heart, you can offer this free gift to other men for them to experience individually or in groups online or in person in your congregation.

 

Dallas Willard observed that the most important thing about a person is not what they do, it is who they become.

 

Who have you become? Who are you becoming? And what do you need to become the man that God meant when he meant you?

 

With our Father’s relentless pursuit and care, we can become the kind of men and leaders to whom God is glad to entrust the care of his Kingdom.

 

Let’s become whole-hearted and trustworthy men together.

 

For you and the men of your church, check out the Becoming a King Experience for free here.

 

And find out more about Becoming a King here.

 

For the Kingdom,

Morgan

 

 

Morgan Snyder is the author of Becoming a King, vice president of Wild at Heart, and founder of BecomeGoodSoil.com. For more than two decades, as a strategist, entrepreneur, teacher, writer, and speaker, he has contended for the restoration of the hearts of men around the globe. Morgan goes off the grid every chance he gets, whether bowhunting in the Colorado wilderness or choosing the adventurous life with his greatest treasures: his wife, Cherie; his son, Joshua; and his daughter, Abigail.

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